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凯时平台

时间:2020-05-31 21:00:20 作者:百度开发者 浏览量:31606

AG88导航网【ag88.shop】凯时平台 OhA3KHqWEnvir【onmen】t/al group WWF h】as accused Hungarian authori【ties of ille\gally】 cu/tting down a forest protected by the /Eu】ropean Union.Last month\,】 Hungary's Nation【a/l Water D】irectorate f/elled a\n old flo】od pl】ain fo/rest in a pr\otected are】a【【 along/【 the T\isza River near T\iszaug, a village som【e 120 kilometres south-east of B】uda/pest.Parts of the area /ar\e pr【o\tected by the EU as a Natura 2000 /site for provi\ding a】 c\or】e breeding and resting place to rare and threatened spec】【ies including black s】torks.Accord】ing to the WWF/, flood pl\ain forests &m【d/a【sh/; an area of l】and near the】 banks of a river 【p【rone to floodin/g &/mdas】h; \ar】e amon\/g the most 【endange/red habitat in Hungary with their s\urface having 】shrunk t/o less than 1% of what it was before/ river regulatio/ns came into force.T\he【 NGO bla/sted the c\ountry's floo\d manag【emen/t practices 【as "unsustainable". It arg】ued /that in many 【previous instances, the felling【【 of trees to redu【ce flooding had not/ been ca\rried out to pr】otect human life and set/tlement, but\ "to prote】ct 】】poor/-qu】ality l【a【nd" /ins】t\ead\ and with little r【egar】d to nature and \wildli【fe【.The group【 said 】【that acro/ss the Ti\sza River Basin, "the 】wil/d【erness】 now resemb//les Mordor"."A large 】part of the \flood plain forest】s and \wetla/\nds have been conf\】【ine/d to riverside emb/ankments, and agricultural areas/ have mainly replaced thes\e form【er large 】floodplains【," Peter Kajner, from WWF Hungary Liv【e R】ivers pro/gr\a】mme】, s/aid.The/ N【GO accused t【he 【National Water Directorate o【f having carried out the felling【 without the proper authorisations and called for st【atutory penalties to be i】m\posed.Th【e National/ Water D】irec\torate ref】ute【d WWF's\ a/llegati【on t】hat the cutti\ng】\ was illegal, writing in a statement that it ha】d follow】ed ministerial dec】re/es and\ secured authorisation from】 t\he local county go】】vernment.It ad/ded t【ha】t cutting do\wn mature t】【rees is an establi//sh【ed p\o】lic】y to reju/venate forests and that it was carri/ed out in January to 】not disturb/ the re【p【roducti\ve period of the rare species w【ho \ca/ll t\he area home.Sha/】re this ar】ticl/eShareTw】eetSharesendShareTwee/tSh【aresen\dMoreHideSha/reSendS\hareS/【hareS/hare/SendShareShareYou m】ight also like \ \ / 】 \ 【 Sziget music festiv/】al in H】ung/】ary showcases its【 green credent】ials / \ R/omania&/#039;s vir/gin forests rava/ged by /】9;wood maf/ia'\ 】 / 【 \ \ 【 【 EU】's young/est c\ommissioner on how to turn climate c【risis ar\ound 【 / More abou】tEnvironmental pr【o【tecti\onFores【tsHungar\y B/rowse t/oda】y's ta\gsx61c

ESLEWhat is Earth Day/? | Euronew【s answersfsGE

CICNThe Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tagsJeOidd7S

kivUWhy I quit my job at Vogue 】to li/ve in a tree for a yea/rPBQn

hspMTe】xt 】si/zeAa/AaThe Danis【h retail\ entrepreneu【r/ and philanthro/pis【t Anders Holc【h Povlsen is already Scotland’s larges【t\ private \land owner. Now he /is/ submitt/ing plans to\ bui/l/d a new】 tourist hub in 】a rem】\ote Highl【and town, amid protest from locals who claim sm】all\ busi\nesses will be driven【 out./The proposed /tourist attraction would be erected in the s\mall village of T【ongue, loca/ted halfw/ay up\ 【the/ sce】nic 【No【r】th Coas】t\ 500 touring route. Tong【ue 【already\ comprise】s of a yo\u\【t\h host\el, craft shop, gen/eral\ \store and \gara/ge, a bank, a 【post off】ice【【 and two hotels.For Povlsen, who【se\】 n/et worth is in the regi/on of €8 billi\on, the goal 】is to/ creat【e a community 【【space in what is des【c\ribed as a “lo/st” a】rea 】of the Highlands【.Anders】 Holch PovlsenAPBo AmstrupThe live planning application/ is being put【 foward 】by Wildland Lim\ited, P】ovlsen】’s self-】m\ade conservation project, wh/ich aims to ad【vance the “sustainable/ 【development of some of Scotland’s most ru\gged, precious and/ 】beautiful landscapes.”What will the】 new village\ be like】?If approv】ed, the vi\llage to\ be【\ called ‘Bur//r’s Stores&rsq】uo;, will consist\】 of 【a /range of amenities inc【luding a】 rest】aurant,】 bakeh】ouse, a shop sellin\g local and se\asonal prod\uce, an even】ts space,【 accommodation】 for staff an\d visitors, new fuel pumps and】 a microbrewery.Acc\ordi/ng to T/\he Heral【d Sc【o】】t\la\/n\d, 】su】ch plans would 】&l【dquo;transform【” /the village and &】ldquo;restore the area to its f\or/mer glory \[]\ whi/le maintaining【 its h\istor\ic c【harac】ter/.&rdquo】; U/nder】 design【\ princ】iples in the/ plann】【ing ap\pl】/ication\, Wi\ldland Limited also claim that the village will “be s【ustainable 】\and respect the n【atural beau/ty” of the area and\ prior/itise /pedestrians.Vision of the/ villageWil】\dland Limite\dEve】nts space for c/\ultural/live music eventsWild】l【\and LimitedBurr'【s Stores 【pr】】opose\d imagesWi\ldland LimitedWill the\ plan/s negatively affect local bus【iness/es?So far, Tongue, Melness and Skerray Co【mmunity 】Council, Kyl/e 】/of Tongue /Hostel and the Ben Loya【l Hotel have a【ll object\ed the plans. “This is n】ot\ fair comp】et【iti】on for other accommodatio\n providers i】n the area 【and will d/irectl\y d/isplace\ business from 】us and other providers,&\rd/quo; 】Suza】\n\ne Mackay,】 【owne/r of\ the Kyle /of\ Tongue Hostel】 and H\olid/ay P\ark, to【ld the Daily M/ail.&ldquo/;Tr】ying to\ compete with a company that has no nee\d to m\ake /a profit is uns/u\s【tain\able,” ag】rees /Sarah Fo】/x from the 】B/en Loyal Hotel.Wil【dland L【imited 】tells Eurone\ws Living that this wil【l in no way be a \tou【rist &lsq】uo;resort’ and is rather a “collection of sensitive【ly re\s\【tored buildin】gs,/ which may house c【afes, small retail\ers and c\o【mmunity spaces.”Highlands, Sc\otlandU【nsplashIn r/esponse to complaints, a spokesperson fro】m】 the/ company co【mmen【ted “we are 【act/ively lis\tening to the views of【 \the com\muni/ty.” They adde】d, “the revitalisati\on of this part of the village w【ill, of course, be a highly colla/\borative effort, with a strong focus】 on complementing Tongue&rsq】/uo;s already】 estimabl\e visitor attr】a】ctions.&rdqu】o\; Ultimately【, &】ldquo;l\eaving this\ site/ to become dereli\ct/ is\ not a【n option,”】 they concl\uded/.The planning document\ states that facil】ities /for both tourists and locals will &/【ldquo;n\ot negative【ly 【】impact 【upon ne/ighbourin】g b】u】【sinesses.”【When asked about h【is conservation p/ro\jec/ts by property cons\ultanc】y Knight Frank, Povlse【n co【mmented, /&ldquo/;you/ might call it philanthropy, 】I\ prefer to think of /it as investing in the natural】 world.”Sha【re this\/ articl\e 【 More from/ pla】ceskb0q

tgVVA/ "monster fatberg," consisting of eve\rythi\ng that shou】ldn't\ 【have /been flu【shed 】down a】】 toilet or poured d【\own a \si\nk, has【 been d【isc】overed/ in Devon, E\n\gland.South We/st /Water (SWW) says the berg【, which\ i/s belie/】ved to the larg\est e【ver found in\ Devon, is\ 64 m【etres in length.To pu【t this into perspective, 【it /is 7 metres lon/ger than the height 【of Italy's Leaning Tower /of P】】isa,【 1【2 】metres longer than the he】ight of/ Nelson【's\ Colum【n in London, 【and 1】7\ metres【 lo】nger t/ha】n the \hei\ght of P/aris【'【 //Arc de Triomphe.It is 【f\ormed of ma\/ny\ wa【\ste 】products, including】 wet wipes, co【ngea/led fat, oil and grease inside the sewer.An【d the/ 【remov】al process isn't expected to be s/imple."This is g/oing t\o t/ake us several weeks to remove," SWW's Director of Wastewater Andrew Roantree said/ 】in a vi】deo \stat【/em/ent \on Twitter."I】t will b/e a difficult/ exercise for our guys, and we ne/ed to】 \do/ it to protect【 the bath【ing wat【er [on the c】oast]."Work to remove the /fatber\g is due to begin on F/ebr/uary 4, /where sew】er 】w【orker\s 】will【 use hig/h-pressure j\et【s, shovels, pi】ckax\es and speci/alist equipment to tac】kle】 the m\onster b【it by bit.The】】se sewer blockag【es costs customers &p】o/und;4】.5 mi【llion a yea【r," South Wes\t Wat/【er w/arne\d."Every ti/me a wet wipe is/ flushed or oil p/oured 【down the】 drain, \there i\s a risk these it【ems【 could \c\ause sewer blockages. This i/s【 extremely unpleasant and could happen in your own home."London '/b\erg'\However, Devon's discovery \is still no 】m【atch for the enormous 250 metre【-lon【g fatberg found in London's sewe】r system i】n 2017.Small p【ar/ts of this chunk o/f waste were later exhibited at the Mu/seum of London,/ while the rest was rec/ycl\ed as bio【fuel to power Lond】on's bus network.REA】D MORE:【/ "BI【N it, don't 【BLOCK】 it!" -】 Monster 'fatber/g' is foun/d in London\ sewerREAD MORE: London】's 'fatberg' moves fro\m sewer/ /to museumShare th】is art\icleCopy/past\e the ar【t\icle video embed link below:CopyShareTweetShare】sendShareTweetShar\esend【MoreHideShareSendSh\areShareShare【SendShareShareYou might al【so like 】 】 】】 \ A circular economy is within \reach if Eu\rop】/ean busines/ses grasp the opportunity ǀ V\iew / \ \ 】 】 】 \ 【 Th】e Ugandan/ singer /tu【rning plastic waste int】o d【rums \ 】 \】 【 Our d\【isposable culture must 【end. We need t/he ‘right to repair’【 not/ recycle our s【martphones】 ǀ】】 Vi\ew More a\boutwastewast\e disposalEnvir/onm/entEnvironmental protection 【 】 Brow/se today&\#0【39\;s tagsP8I8

Scienti【st】s es【ti【mate that roughly 】on/e million la\n/d and\ marin【e species may】 bec【ome extinct in the foreseeab/le f\uture. Many within】 decades. What are the main【 reasons for th/e decl\ine\ of under/water ec\osystems?Thanos Dailianis, a marine\ biologist fr】om the\// HCM【R-IMBB\C /resea【rc【h instit/ute /【in【 Crete,/ exp\la/\i】ns.“Marine ecosyste】ms are threatened bo/th locally 】\an【d globally/. At the lo\cal l】【evel, the/ coastal zo】ne hosts】 a lot of 【human activities, 】/ i\mp】】o\rt\ant human activities, like 】urban【isation, like agricu\lture, industry of】 co/urse, and【 ot\her uses which cause loc【a\lise/d fo】rms of degradation, l【ike pollutio/n,/ l】et’s s\ay.""But on the other hand, we have la\rge-sca\【le ph】enomena, like global warming/, or ocea/n a\cidificat/ion, which【【 \of course jo】in toge/the】r with the local】 pre\ssures and【 cause/ sometimes uncontrolled ef【/fects【.""In Crete, 】we’/re located in t/he Eastern/ Mediterranean which】/ ri\ght now【 i/s the warmest place in the Mediterranean/ basin.\ This【, a/】lon/【gsid\e with】 the adjacency with /the S\u【ez Cana【l, makes \it】 very sus\ce】pti【ble to ch【an/g【e right now.""So what we see here is an// early w】arning o/f 】things that will probably spread/ 】towards【 the 】west】 of the Mediterranean /in the\ fo\】rthcoming\ years.""/And【 of cour\se, these t【hings also happen at the global level. Global w/armin/g is a global t/hr【eat, of course, and species coming fr【/om other parts /of \th/e world is【 a universal trend right now becaus【e of this ong/oing c/hang/e.""We are of c【ourse c/oncerned because we feel it is our duty to preserve t/his biodiversity for future generations, an/d we feel t【hat righ【/t now it/’s on the ve\rge of be】coming de\g\r\ade\d.""Nature finds its ways, and t【/his 】ri/ch/ness will/ be replaced by \another richness. /The】 problem is\ mainly for us because we ha】v【e built our 【lives \with this biodive/rsity, so the loss of t/his biodiversity 【will /ma/inly af/【】f\ect hum【【ans as a species.""T】he \service\s it provides to us,/ the food, the 】\environment; all the】 stuff that makes】 our【 life nice \t【o live.\&/rdquo;Share this art】icle\【Copy】/paste the article video\ embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShare】SendS】hareShareShareSendShareS】hareYo【u /might a\lso like 】 】 】 What’s k/illing】 our \unde【rw/ater ecosystems? 】 【 】 】 / 】 】 Uncharted wate】rs: how maps ca/n help prevent conf\lict o【v/er /marine resources 】 / 【 \ 【 【 \ \ Famil】y-run fisheries struggle as n/ew generation casts net wider 】 【 More a】boutOceanFauna and Flor【aEn\vironment/【al prot【\ectionbiodiversityGree【ce 】 Mo】st viewed \ \Wh】at influ/ence on climate i\s the corona\virus lockdown rea\lly【 having? \ 【 【 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】premature babies from infec】tion 【 Me/ssenger RNA: th【e mol【ecul/e that \may teach \our bodies to b【e/at cancer 【 \ 【 Apple and Go\ogle 【say they'll work toge/th【er to trace spr\e\ad of coronavirus\ \via smart\p\hones / How EU】 funding is changi\ng 【【the face of La\tvian innova】ti\on \ 】 Browse today�/39;s tags

C6HFW\o/rld\'s highest-operating 】w\eather 】stations 【ins/t】a】lled【 on Mount Eve】restAp7K

xTFm360 \Video: Putting\ marine\ /reso【ur/ces on the ma\p46zC

PFya“The lo\nge/r the sup】ply 】chain, the m/ore 【is【 wasted/”GOrZ

VmVK【The Green Revol【ution - fast【e【r, cheaper and more eff/icient teles\copic w/indt【urbines 【KDtx

kbdLCan 【econom\ic grow/th and protectin】g the env【【ironment go hand in hand? 】In this episode【】 of 】Bu】siness\ 】Planet】 Euronews travelled t】o A/ust\r\ia to look at the efforts whi/ch are underway to fost【er inn\ovati】on, transform industry and create su【st【ainable growth 】across Europe. "Sustai】nabl【【e econo/mic【 development /aims】 t【/o /reach a balanc【e between envir【onmental\ and climate protection】, qu】ali/ty【 of 】life and economic gr】owth. 】I【t's pos】sible to observ【e, through】 our em】pirical data, that【 the green econ【omy is a driver fo【r】 growth/. In the past fe【w\ 】】ye】ars, \the Austrian environmental technology 【industry has grown almost t\wice as fast/ a【\s the /economy /as a whole in re\cent years," Andreas Tschulik, Austrian environment minist】【/ry.The Eu\ropean Commission is invest】ing 】in】 EU industry for a modern, clean and fair/】 】eco\n】】om/y. One company w\hich epitomise【s this drive \is ECOP Technolog/ies, near V】ienna. The 【co】mpany 【manufac【/tur【【es rotatio【n heat pumps for industrial use. Using innovative techno【logy \the firm helps other companies to recover en\e/rgy and /】save cost【s whi\c】h 】in turn\ help\s protect the e\nvi\ronment【."With our rotation he/at pump we r\each i\n 【specific appl/ications return on【 inves\tm【ents 】with/in three to seve/n years and 【compared to \burning gas,/ but we save an/ enor【mous amoun\/t o【/】f CO2 and this is the reason why we get supp/o】rted by 】the EU th\rough the/ horizon 20 program," says \ ECOP's 】CEO, Bernha\rd Adler. 】 \ECO】P's /innovative work saw it win this y\ear's【 European Busi】ness Aw\ard for Environ\/m】e\nt."Innovation is the key to tr\ansform th\e】 current eco\nomic system 】into a gre\en economy. \/Wit【h】out inn【ov】ati】o\n/ we will n】ot be able to r/each our glo/ba/l climate protection goals. Abov】e average investment into research and 】development】 res【ults in above average grow】th/," in\sists Tschulig. ​ He adds, "\Our top envir【onm\ental po\licy goals are to cut greenhouse gas emissions and /r/educe /consumption.【 A lot o/f compan/ies realise【 this a】nd 【are/ ta/king a【/dvan/tage【 of the 】resulting bus/ines【s opportunit\ies. But t/】he /whole of socie】t/y is ben【efiting【 from thi\s, given t/hat many\ gre\en jobs have been creat】ed throughout the whole valu】e chain."&\#8203; 【 Top EU innovatio【n prioritiesEncouraging innovation and inve】stment to【 crea/te new \jobs and b\oost gr\owth has always】/ been a prior\ity【 for the EU.G/rowth cannot com/e a\t t\he cost of the environme【nt. We need sustainab/ility.Protection of the environment/ and 】sus/tainabl/e development both demand \in/nova\tio/n.Innovatio【n 】bridges t\h【e gap between research an\d the market, making ideas that pr\otect the enviro【nment comm\er【cially\ viable.T\he E/U org】anises the E【urope【an Busines【s 【Awards to recog/nise compan/ies putti】ng inn】】/ovati【on /【a\nd sustainable devel\opment at the heart of their busi】/ness acti/vities.】The a【wards are presented ev/ery two y【ears in five categ/ories: Manage/me【nt, Product and services, Process i【nnovat/ion, International business\ c【oo/peration and Business and bio/div【er/sity.The 2018 】Awar/ds w/ere presented on 14 November in Vienna, Austria.Sha【re thi【s articleCopy】/past\e the article video embed link below:Cop】yShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSh】aresendMoreHideShareSendS/hareShareShareS【endS】hareShareMo/】re aboutBusinessAustriaEnv】iron】mental p【/】/rotection Bro】wse today's ta】gsqB6E

4lRYA/ "monster fatberg," consisting of eve\rythi\ng that shou】ldn't\ 【have /been flu【shed 】down a】】 toilet or poured d【\own a \si\nk, has【 been d【isc】overed/ in Devon, E\n\gland.South We/st /Water (SWW) says the berg【, which\ i/s belie/】ved to the larg\est e【ver found in\ Devon, is\ 64 m【etres in length.To pu【t this into perspective, 【it /is 7 metres lon/ger than the height 【of Italy's Leaning Tower /of P】】isa,【 1【2 】metres longer than the he】ight of/ Nelson【's\ Colum【n in London, 【and 1】7\ metres【 lo】nger t/ha】n the \hei\ght of P/aris【'【 //Arc de Triomphe.It is 【f\ormed of ma\/ny\ wa【\ste 】products, including】 wet wipes, co【ngea/led fat, oil and grease inside the sewer.An【d the/ 【remov】al process isn't expected to be s/imple."This is g/oing t\o t/ake us several weeks to remove," SWW's Director of Wastewater Andrew Roantree said/ 】in a vi】deo \stat【/em/ent \on Twitter."I】t will b/e a difficult/ exercise for our guys, and we ne/ed to】 \do/ it to protect【 the bath【ing wat【er [on the c】oast]."Work to remove the /fatber\g is due to begin on F/ebr/uary 4, /where sew】er 】w【orker\s 】will【 use hig/h-pressure j\et【s, shovels, pi】ckax\es and speci/alist equipment to tac】kle】 the m\onster b【it by bit.The】】se sewer blockag【es costs customers &p】o/und;4】.5 mi【llion a yea【r," South Wes\t Wat/【er w/arne\d."Every ti/me a wet wipe is/ flushed or oil p/oured 【down the】 drain, \there i\s a risk these it【ems【 could \c\ause sewer blockages. This i/s【 extremely unpleasant and could happen in your own home."London '/b\erg'\However, Devon's discovery \is still no 】m【atch for the enormous 250 metre【-lon【g fatberg found in London's sewe】r system i】n 2017.Small p【ar/ts of this chunk o/f waste were later exhibited at the Mu/seum of London,/ while the rest was rec/ycl\ed as bio【fuel to power Lond】on's bus network.REA】D MORE:【/ "BI【N it, don't 【BLOCK】 it!" -】 Monster 'fatber/g' is foun/d in London\ sewerREAD MORE: London】's 'fatberg' moves fro\m sewer/ /to museumShare th】is art\icleCopy/past\e the ar【t\icle video embed link below:CopyShareTweetShare】sendShareTweetShar\esend【MoreHideShareSendSh\areShareShare【SendShareShareYou might al【so like 】 】 】】 \ A circular economy is within \reach if Eu\rop】/ean busines/ses grasp the opportunity ǀ V\iew / \ \ 】 】 】 \ 【 Th】e Ugandan/ singer /tu【rning plastic waste int】o d【rums \ 】 \】 【 Our d\【isposable culture must 【end. We need t/he ‘right to repair’【 not/ recycle our s【martphones】 ǀ】】 Vi\ew More a\boutwastewast\e disposalEnvir/onm/entEnvironmental protection 【 】 Brow/se today&\#0【39\;s tagsIrA8

WZ8DFi】nding gold i【n t【he gu【tt\ers of 【BrusselsOPDJ

c84NGree【n festival: partying conscio/】usl【y at Sziget FestivalmOkw

PohgText sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placesPEKu

QCs8Tradition and innov】ation in car b【odywork\TTgP

SF3GWatch: British sculptor cre\ates a【 /marine e【xhibition\ in Tuscany\5g07

EUuQTo【r\re Guaceto, a】n eight-kilometre long stretch of coastli【ne north-west of Brindisi, used to be【 know/n as a centre for poor fishing practic\es, black market smuggling and /a drop-off point 【for illegal immi\gration.Now it's famous around t【he world for the【 way 】it's t【ransf/ormed itsel】f.The coast i【s n】ow a\ p\rotected mar【ine 【re\serve and s【trict】 rules are in /place so that /tourism\ and fishin/g don’t】 har】m the nat\ural env\ironment.The【 European Uni】on】 h\as comm\itted to se\t aside 10 per ce/nt o【f【 all i】ts waters as 】marine protecte【d\ ar\eas by 2020. This targ/et was met two y】ears before the d//eadline. Today, 62】5,000 squa【re kilometre/s of marine and coastal waters in Europe are protected, which 【is 【expected to bring【 m/ore than 3 billion euros of annual benefits.In/ 2/001, Torre Guaceto imposed a 【/five-yea/r ban 【on f/ishi】ng to rebui【\ld the ca/\tastrophic\all【y declining s/tocks. To】day, a fe\w loc【als/ are permitted to fish fo\r j】ust one day a wee/k, usin】\g n】ets that c】an’t catch】 small fish.Fisherma【n Cosimo De Bi\asi to【ld 】Ocean/: 】【“Be/\f】】ore the r/eserve w【as\ /establish/ed, this 】whole area was rife 【with dyna】mite fish/i】ng/, cigaret【\te【 smuggling and illegal immigr】a/nts. Today, thanks to /the p【r\otected area, all we can see here is th】e pristine sea.”The protecte【d area is man\aged by【 a consortium \that represents【 local communities and/ the/ World Wide Fu【nd for Natur】e, th】e// WWF.It enf/orces the rul】es that have【 been \agreed with \the fish\ermen. Th【at \includes monitoring the\/ir catches to ma\k【e su/re that the pr】otection e】ffor\【ts are 【effective.And the fishermen are happy with【 the new controls on what t/\hey catch.“When we ca\t】ch a big fish an\d brin/g i\t ashore, we can sell【 it n【ot for f/\ive eur/o/】s, but for】 /20 【to 25 euros,&r】【dquo; De Biasi said.Francesco \de Franco, head of t【he envir\onmental an【d technical unit at the Torre Guaceto con\sortium, said fish stocks h\a】ve recovered in the marine reser\ve.&l】dquo;O【utside the protect\ed area, the levels of\ fish /rem\ain basically the same】 as in the past. And in\s】ide this are\a, the \fis/h /s】tocks have rough【ly doubled,\" h】e \said.Wider be/nefitsAnd /it’s no】t just the sea that&rsquo\;s【 being protected. The dunes and we【t【lands along t】he/ coas\tline are a precious stop-off point for migratory bi/rds】 and a perman【【ent 】home to m/any l/ocal /spec】【ies.\The Torre /Guaceto area, named after its 】centuries-ol\d watchtowe】r, is patrolled day \】and ni】ght by the coast guard and 】the police. They】 【say most danger toda【y comes【【 from careless visito【rs w\ho might pick plants or damage coral\ near the shor\e.To/urists\ who re/spect the environment are welcome).In the p【ast, these sandy beaches were 【f\ull of litter and overcrowded. 】】Cleaning up the area, 】introdu\c】ing 】guided t/our\s and【 l\imiting car a】ccess\ made a 】big diff【erence: now, 【in peak】 season,/ Torre Guaceto /gets】 visited /by 5000-6000/ tourists a day.Mimmo Miccoli fro】m Bres/cia has been visiting for years.&ldq\uo;This /place used to be a m】ess, wi】th/\ cars parked every/where,"\ /he told Oce】an. "Now, all the cars have to /be l/eft in the car /pa【r【【k at th\e\ top of t\he roa\d /—【 /】so the pl】ace is 【no/w much 【nice/r, cl/eaner\.”The \f\low of tourist\s 【also bene【fi【ts businesses that have embraced the】 t\rend for sust/ainability.Ma】ria\ Lanz【il/otti 【runs a restaur/ant in nearby Car/ovigno which s/pe\cial【【ises in lo【ca【l orga/nic cu\isin】e.&l【dquo;We always/ have fresh, good, healthy fish from the se【a," /she said. "And ou】r lan】d produces lo/ca/l toma/toes and so on, so it is very import【ant \for me and for all of us restaurateurs /to have this natural \【res【erve — it’s our marvel!&rdquo/;Backed by European f\unds, o/ne-thi【rd of 】local farms have n\o/w conve\【rted to【 organic productio/n, boos】ti【ng 【the【ir sales by associati/ng their brand【s with the n】ow fam\ous Torr】e Guaceto pr\otected【 area.E】stablished to preserve the environment, this marine protected ar【/ea became an attractive/ ec\o-】tourism destinat】ion with a/ sus/tainabl】e econ\omy &mdas\h; a success story th】a】t\ expert/s say should serv/e an example to othe】r places 】like Torre Gua/ceto/.Ni】co】lò Carnimeo, 【vice-presid【ent of the Torr】e Guaceto mana【gement consortium, \s/ai】d:【 “I \would\ say【 t】hat protecting 10 per cent of 【Eur【ope’s waters is st\ill not eno【ugh — we sho\uld go further, keepi】ng in mind the s/o-called /circ】ul】ar eco】nomy, l\ike wh\at we ha【ve he\re. Thi/s does work, and I would say thi】s is how i【【t should be d】one in other mar【ine protecte】【d areas 】too.&r【dquo;1212121212【/1212Sha/re thi】s articleCopy/p】ast/e the article video embed link】 below【【:CopyS【ha】re\TweetSh\ar【esen/dShar/eTweetS\haresendMoreHid/eShareSendShareShareShareSendSha【reShareYo/u might al【so lik\e 】 / \ Sea ch/an/ge: how 】one 】small】 stretch of coastline in Italy tr】ansfo】rmed itself 】 /【 More aboutEnviro【nm】ental protec【【tionFauna and FloraFisherySea 【 \ \ Most /】v【iewed 【\ \ 】 What in/fluence/ on c【li【mate】】 【is \th\e coronavir】\us】 lockdo\wn r【eally having? 【 / / 【 \ 【【 】 The new AI system sa】feguarding premature ba】bies \from infectio】n 】 \ Messen】ger R】】NA: the molecule that may te【ac/h our bodies to beat cancer / 】 Apple and 】【G\oogle say they'll work together to tra/】c\e spr【ead of c/oronavirus via【 smartphones 【 / / / How】 EU fun\d【ing is【 changing/ t】he face o\f Latv/ian innovation/】 / \ 【 / 【 Brow【se today'/s tagsJ5n8

JvF9Life under /t】he s【ea【 is at risk\. I】nternational tar】gets for pro\tecting /biod/iversity appear t/\o\/ be out of reach/. By 2020】, 】countries w【ith a co\astline must 】】esta【blish【 Marine Protected/ Areas (MPAs) to ensure the conservation of wildlife\ and flora. According to a stu//dy by the WWF, 】the European Union is far from leading the way/."We have 23 M/ember S【ta\tes w\ith marine area in the EU. 1】9 of these】【 are under the %【 limit of 【hav\ing effective mana/】gement /\for 】protected areas and w/ith just【 one year to go. And what's even mor【e alarming is tha/t half of the【m, 1//1 of them, have no 【manage【ment pl【ans what【soever, de\veloped or reported," exp【lai【ns Jani】ca Borg, Mari】ne Protecti\o【n an】d Spatial Plann】in\g Policy Coordinator a【t the WWF/ Europea】n Policy Office an/d lead author.EU \countries should/ set aside nearly 12% of their marine areas 】as mari【ne protected are】as. But according to the\ NGO, the bloc's share curr】ently accounts for less t】han 2%."I【'm d\isappoi\nted because fr/om the point o\】f】 view o\f the fishing industry marine prot/ected ar/eas offer /g】reat opport【unities to provid\e nurseri/es\ fo\r fish 【an/d to allow the fish to become\ bigger.\【 And/ as we know bigger i\s be】tter beca//use 】big fish breed in/ more numbe\rs. So ma【r/ine p/r\o【tecte/d are\a】s, /10】%, 15%, provide a g【r/eat bac\kground for 【a fish/ing in\dustry," Chr/is DAVIES (UK), Member of the Eur\opean Parliament,\ Renew Europe gro】up, cha】ir of the Comm】itte\e 【on Fisheries told Euronews.The protection o\f b【iodi\ver\sity varies from\ one ma\ritim】e area【 to another\. Addi【tio【nal efforts are needed\ in the Mediter【ranean and th】e Bl\【】/ack Sea. Without the】se】 marine pro【tected areas, \th/e survival of our oc/】eans is at risk.Share this articleCopy/paste】 the 【】arti【cle video/ \embed link be】【low:【Co【pyShareT/weet\SharesendShar/eTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareSh\areShareSendShareSh/areYou m/ig/ht 】al【so like 】 /Watch:/ Rescuers /save Orcas stranded on Argen【t【in】e b】each / 【 / E【U fis】h quota \quarrel -【 min【isters】 hail d【eal, NGOs/ 【sl//am overfishi】ng】 【 【 \/\ / 【 The/ Battle for】 /Brussels roads 【 \ More aboutEnv【i\ronmenta\】l protectionPollutionWWF 】 Browse today】's tagsZ0TP

cmyVScientists in【 J\or/dan have discov【ered that corals \in the 【Gulf of Aqab【a are\ resisting the rise \in】 water tempe/ratures.Across the\ w/orld/, coral reefs are【 dying at rapid rates due\ to overfis\hing, pol【lution an/d climate ch】ange.It&rsq/uo;s est/i/mated that\ half the of earth\’s r【/eefs have been lost.This figure is thought to be critical, considering that corals are the habita\t of /one in fou【r 【of all marine species.【/Furthermore, up to half of the w/orld&rs【q【u/o;s oxygen co【mes】 fro【m t【\he oceans and the cor\a【l r\eefs wi/【thin.The exact/ reason /for the corals’ resilience in Jordan is s【till unknown, but some analys\t/s b【eli【eve tha\t t/he creatures【 evolved d/ur\ing/ the \last ice age of more tha【n 20,000 years ago.Samp/le/s of c/or/als in Jor/dan used for【 analy/sis】Doctor Fuad Al【\-Horani, professor of coral 【bi】ology and ecology at the //University of\ Jordan, ho\pes that the marine】 inverteb】ra】tes【 【may one-day be the ke】\y to re-pop/ulating th】e world’s\ dyi】ng reefs.“There are tech【niques -/ we can propagate corals," he says. "We can climatise them to c/on/ditions available to them in t【he other 】seas. So, o/nce we grow 】them, w】e can send them abroad where/ they【 ca【n grow them into 】dete【riorated areas or damaged 】r】eef areas./&rd】quo】;Doctor Al Hor/ani wor/ki/ng on c【orals in JordanTOURISM & EC【ONOMIC DEVELOPMENT\ STIL/L J\EOPARDISE AQABA RE【\EFSSpanni】ng【 a distance of 2】7 kilom】etres,/ the s/l/ither】 o\f coastland】 calle】d Aqab/a【 is/ Jordan&/rsq\uo;s only sea-outlet.Despite glimm\ers of hope, the port【\ city&/rsq\uo;s coral remains\ in dange/r, wit】h glo【bal dev【elopment and pollution threatening its surv】ival.Jordan&r】squo;s【 coastland and 】only portTo enc\ourage【 economic】 d【ev/e【lop】ment, whi/lst p\rotecting the re\【efs, i/s therefore a con/【stant c/】hallenge f/or the Jordanian authorities.】Aqaba\ is a major tourism hub which we【lcomed around 100,000 v\isito\rs last year. D/ue to t/he sector&rsqu【o;s expansion, Jordan&rsquo】;/s only 【port 【w】as/ re【locat/ed to】 the si/te 【of one of Aqa/ba&r/squo】】;s lar【gest reefs in 2006/.The governmen【t, w/ith \th/e help of the United Natio/ns, worked to save a portion of t【he t/housand-year-old 【【reef【 by r】/elocatin【g\ t【he coral two miles f】】urther \【alo/ng the coastline】.Co【ral r/eefs in Jo\rdan being r/\eloc/【\atedAccord/ing to Neda/l Al Ouran, He/ad of】 \th/e Environment【, Climat\e Change and Disaster Risk Reduc\tion of th】e United Nations Development/ Programme, /the/ replantation far】ed mu/ch better than \expec【】ted.&】ldquo;We had great】 success,” he says. &ldquo【;Lucki】ly, we got】 a grow】th【 ra/te\ of more \t【han 85 per cen\t,】 w】hich is unique.\ Globally, you would fin\d 【the average growth rat\e af【】ter tra/nspl】antation and translocation would 】be 65\】.”Eco-dive\rs in the region l】ike Abdullah Al Momany, howe/ver【, believe that much more still/ n】】eeds to be done.He is fearful that the relentless rate o】f progress and de】velopme】nt is thre【at【ening to compro】mise the re】al draw of the area/, the re/efs.&ldqu】o/;Here in Aqaba, our \big/gest pr\oblem is us affec/ting【 the marine【 environment as humans,&rd\quo; he says. &ldquo\;I think the government need/s to enforce the law, do more awar【enes\s program【m】【es, and/ do m/ore effort/ in /protect】ing the marine life.&rdqu/o;Share this arti】cleCopy/paste th】e ar/tic【l【】】e video embed lin】k【\ below:CopyShareTweetS【haresendSh/ar【eTwee/tSharesendM【oreHid\eSh/areSendShareSh【\ar【eShareSendShareShareYou m\i/ght【/ also lik】e \ \ 【 /Rain, flood【s and confused se\als: Inside/ An】\tarcti】ca's warmest-ever summ/e】r 】 \ / \ 】 / C】limate migrants: How even\ rich Bavaria ca/nnot provide sh】elter from glo/bal warm】in\g 】 【【 / 】 【 】 Living i【n \a ghos\【t town: Mee/t the Moldovans w/ho refus\e t】o b】e climate m【igra【nts 】 【 M\ore abou】tGlobal warmi/ng and /climate changeEnvironmental pr/otectionEcologySeaJordanHot TopicLearn more about \ Global 【warmin【g an\d climate change Hot TopicLear\n/ mo】r】】e about Global warming and clima【】te change / Browse today's【 tagsf5LY

1.koFFHow Western wi/ll Sa】udi Arab【ia go t\o【 attr】act tourists?ufmY

2.a7PJFrom Amsterdam】 to Sy【dney on el【ec/t/r\icityccsM

3.xXvxDepl\eted f/ish stocks can’t w【ait. The EU and\ Norway need to commit to ending over【fishin【g now 【ǀ Viewxpmz

4.1Au7Text si【zeAaAaThe common hippo】p【o/ta/mus is know\n for th\eir /rapacious appetites and spending a lot /of/ time/\/ in water, no wond】e【r, 'river hor【se is the literal En】glish translation o\f【 the Greek word Hipp【opotamus/. T\hey spend up to 16 ho/ur/s a day submerg】e【d in rive/rs and la】kes to keep their massive bodies cool under th/e hot African sun. And in t//he rest of /their】 time? They consume】\ bet/ween 25-40 kilos of grass.And with【 these two \act【ions, they already do a lo【t for th/ei【r env/iro【nmen/t. A recent study b\/y /University of Antwerp 】biolo】g\ist J\onas Schoelynck and his/ 】col/leagues, published in Scienc【e Ad/vances found hippo/' daily hab【its pl/ay a key role in maintainin/g】 e/co】syste【ms. Th\【e scientists fo】und out about their key r/ole【 by/\ /】analysing s/ample/s from the Mara R\iver, which runs throu【gh t】he Maasa/i Mar【a National Reserve, a savann\ah in Kenya.The mam//mal】s living in this park are protected, h【oweve】r\, ou/tsid/e o】f t】hese a/r\ea/s scient/ist\s sa/y h\ippo numbers/ are down. The IUCN Red \List describes the hippos as vulnerable and now scientists are war/ning 【tha】t t\h/e dw【indling number of hippos across A/fr\ica/ \is potentially harmful to the continent's /rivers and la/k】es.Clic/k on the video a/bove to see how hippo\s make th】e ecosystem run around them.Share this article More \/f】rom pl】acesff5q

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3AzNFor 50 yea\r】s an Israeli【 o【il comp【【any has 】kept bathers 【off a Red Sea bea/ch near】 t/he resort of Eilat bu】t \it co【/uldn’t 】stop sea life from flouri\shing.I【n a wor\ld where co】【r】al r】eefs are s】hrink\ing rapidly, the one \in Eila\t has grown.Due/ to /a lack of human interf】e【rence,】 a spectacular /coral reef blo/】sso】med o】v【er time attracting exotic /fi】sh \and/【 dolphins to th/is 【aquatic paradi\se.The 300-me\tre-long be】ach was handed back to the publi\c a year an/d a half ago after the】 Eilat Ashkelon P【ipeline 】Company (EAPC) 【scaled back it\s operat】io【ns.Now, with access lift【【e/d, int】erest is /mounting 【f\rom scuba divers \an\d tourist】s/ alike w/ho want【 to vi】sit.In response, Israel's Na/ture and Par/ks Authority decided to relocate the cora\ls for their own pr/otecti】on so \the /ind】ustri/al de/bris left /】】by E【APC\ could be removed.S【hare this articleCopy/paste】 t【he article 【video embe】/d link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendS】hareTw】eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【areShare\ShareSendSh/areShareY/ou\ might also 【like 】 '\;Israel is no l/onger a democracy�】9;: Netan\yahu accused of exp【loi】ting coron/avirus to sa/ve career 【 / 】 \】 / / Israel e\】lection: Exit p/olls give Netanyah】u nar\r/ow/ lead / 【 \ \ 】 】 】 / 】 \ \/ / 】 】 Palestinian P\resident Ab】bas cu】ts ties with Israel a】nd US 】over peace plan / More aboutCora/lsIsrael\Envir【onmentEnvironmental protectio【noil 【industry】Touri\sm Browse today's tag】sLv2b

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pp2wIc【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gsI5UL

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IFsrT/ext siz【eAaAaTakin【g you on a jou【rne】y ac\ross t/he Yorksh/ire Dales an【d all【/ the way\ to Vanco【uver Is【land, Kate Fletcher&/【rsquo;s "Wild Dress" is an autob】iographica】l me】ander through the tende/r mom【ents wher/e clothing ha\s made her f/e【el 【embedde】d in nature. A Professor o【f su】stainability, design and【 fashi】on at the U\niversity of the Arts Lond/】o\/n; Fletch【er【 h\as】 been /a】t t】\he forefront of 【the\ c】/all for s\/ystematic change in /the fas【hion /industr【y.\ In her 【first col】lection of person【al writin】gs, \】Fletcher】 ha/s chosen t/o explore the complex and often art】ificially detached re】la/【t\ionship between the natur【al world a/nd/ what 【we\ wear.Fle/tcher looks at clothing as/ something m\ore e/ssential and far 【beyond its /si】mple【, modern, role as/ a dis】posabl【e commodity. It’s \no【t difficult to see that our c【ultural relationship with clothing has been【 】distorted by years of f/ast-movin【g/ \mo【de】rn /fashio】n t】rends but as she recou】nts the story of her【 【dad&rsquo/;s favourite jumper, there is a glimmer of some nostalgic, int】ergen/er【ational import\ance that breaks through/. Mending this dec【ade/】s-old piece of clothin/g using wool found 】in hedgerows and on fences she mus\es about this as a/ rebellious /act. “As I worked my lap felt w/arm,” she writes【, “Doing this felt like a way to live not】 j/u】st through the rules of 【modern society.&rdqu\o;Ch/arlie M\ee/chamIt’【s not just abo/ut rebell【ing \for the sake of reduci/ng w【ast/e, 】however. Fletcher rec】o【gnizes the】【 way t/hat modern out】do\or clothing i【mpos【es a kind of】 distance from the natural \world.【 The 】clothing we ch\/oose to wear becomes a divisio【n; 】farmworker vs lando【wner, recr\eatio/nal h/iker vs those \who work the land. A ne【ed for\ spe】/ci】fi【c, tec【h】no\log】ically advanced outdoor gear in b\right neon oil-based mat】erials 【is, Fletcher says, ju\st another in/dicat\ion of rampant cons\um\er \cult/ure.Th/e art installati【on teac】hing us to c【are for our/ forestsLivin/g Recomm【ends | A/ "vital tool】"\ for fighting the rising tide of si】ngle/ use plasticsL】\ivin【g Recommends 】| /No/ one is too s】mall to 【make a d【iffer】enceIt’s\ a v【ery d/\】i/fferent way to int【【roduce this/ message. Distan/t from the usual ev/ils of fast fa】sh/ion’s rapidly evolving aesthetics, she e】xp/lores the im\prac/tic/ali【ty of the always new in【 the/ face o/f the a\n】ci\ent /forces of the elements. Fletcher is【n’t preaching about all of the usual】 sust【ainab】le fa】/shion clichés but instead inviting you to think differently about how you\r/ garments can bring y】ou joy. T\he thrill o【f newness is fleeting 【but\ rich cultural relat\】】io】nships can and will【 last 【a lif//e\【time.Jack Gr\angeShunning the newness\ of n\/eoprene allows you to embrace /a\ more per/me\able【 exterior【. &/ldquo】;Once we\/&【rsquo;re there, we learn from the land and listen\ to the voic/es /of the b\irds and the \rain,” she writes, “We /give attentio】n to the unta【med parts of our【 world, in【】clud/ing that 【part in ourselves. [...] And this】 requires,】 at the least, that we make the \la】yers\ that【 \we build up 】ar【ound ourselves&【\mdash; some of wh】ich 】ar】e【 fashio【n in cloth—more permeable.&rdqu】o; Our clothing does\n&rsquo】;t alway】s have to /fo【rm】 a bar】】r【ier \between th】e inside and t】he outside, sometimes, whe】n your /&ldquo\;co】at&\rsquo;s wide sleeves grip\ onto\ t/h/\e lip o】f a gust&rdquo【】;】 o】r/ your &ldq】uo;trousers, wide-】legged act as a kite&rdq】u/o; it can \help you form \a connecti/on 】with na【tu/re.Kate Fletch/【er's Wi】ld Dress: Clothing a\nd the】 natural world is av\ailable from Uniformbooks, more \informatio】n can be fou\nd here.Share this articl/e M/ore 【from\ lifeXlx7

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ea8FHow smal/l scale fisher【ies sa】ved/ Danish f\ishing c\ommunitiesuIba

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dWbET\ex【t sizeAaAaA lot\ has been said rec【ently abo【【ut the 】negati【ve\ impac【t of eating t/oo /much meat.\ N】ot \only ha\s too 【much of the proces\se】】d k】ind been linked to a higher ri【sk \of some cancers, /but the environmental 【impact of intensive 】farming and agric【ultural car】/bon emissions】 are a serious concern. \Ho【weve\r, you/ don’t necessarily have t/o turn veggi/e \in order to make a positive difference &\ndash; i\n【ste【ad make more thought【ful choices w\hen buyi】ng and c】ooking 】meat. Her\e&rsq/uo;s \how…Buy/ les/s mea\tThis may be obvious,】 【but buying less meat is one 】of the best thi】ngs you can do for both the environment and our】 health. 【We’re nearly al\l guilty of pi/ling too【 much o】】n our\ 【】【plates, and 】o【ften w\asti【ng bits that/ /w/】e can】’t manage to eat, so buying /less can h】elp reduce waste and ensur/e be【tter portion control while \a/lso/ lower】ing our environmental impact. R\ather than choosing pre-p/ac【ked sup\erma/【rk/et /mea【t where you h/ave very little choice】 in/ 【t【erms of quantity, try to buy from】 a \local butcher or farm shop where you can s】pecify exactly 】h\ow mu【ch you’d like. You’ll】 reduce your plasti\c usage t/his way too【.In【 part/】icu】lar, buy less b【eef – as methane-p\r\oduc\ers【, co\ws ar【e thought to have the \biggest i\mpact on our cl\imate as compared to any other form o\f l/ivestock. In fact, data s】ugge【sts that【 c】ows release the e\quiv\alent of 16k/g of carbon diox【id\e for ev\ery/ ki/l【o of mea【t produced. Interes】tingly, the impac】\t sh】eep have is al/so quite signif【ic/ant at 13kg of/ CO2 for/ every kilo o】f me/at produced.Bulk out mea\ls with extra vegetables (lentil】\s and beans are a great addition to dishes such as sp【/a\g【hetti 【Bolo/】gnese a】nd stews), and consider having at least one day a w\eek【 where \you eat no meat a】t a【ll. &lsq【【】uo】】;Meaty&r【squo/; vegetab【les such as mush】rooms and aubergines 】are gre/at alternatives【 t】o use o/n/ thes】e days 【and 【there ar【e plenty of r【ecipes online f\or hearty vegetarian】 dinners. Dishes that use lots of spic/es and herbs\ c\an【 als】/o help mask the absence of meat, as you’ll be \t\oo busy enjoyi/ng the bold flavou【rs to mis【s it.\Rel/ated |How to have\ a sustainable su/mm】er b/bqCh\o】ose m/eat tha【】t’s been produ【ced ethicallyWhen buyi【ng mea【t, opt for liv【esto/ck pr】od\uced by ethi\cal/ farmers usi】ng s【maller-scale methods that promote the welfare \of the an】ima【l【.【 This means avoi/\din【g【 in】tensi】【/vely【 farmed animals, which are simply bred for the highest output and profit possible and are often pumped full of a】n【ti\bi/otics (something whi/ch is incre】asin】gly becoming a t//hreat to human hea\lth). Look f】【or meats with a cre/dib【le animal welfare certification to\ pu/t your min/【d at rest. Local produce bought at place/s such as【 farm shops, org/\anic st】ores or go【od q/u/ality butchers are usual】ly re\a】red with【 t\hese 【ethic【al g】uidelines in mind.Relate\d【 | Top 7】 orga【nic res】taurants in L\on/donChoose me\at from livestock fed from l】ocal s】our】cesMany animals \re\are【d f\or their m】eat【 are fed on plant pro【tein】s that are 【/gro/\wn specifical】ly/ for this purpose \and imported. Sadly/, huge swath\es of land in/ coun/tries such as Brazil and Paraguay h【ave been impacted by t\his】 &\ndash; w\ith forests b\eing cut 【down and co/mmunitie/s moved to make way for crops. 】To lessen your environmenta【l footprint, choose meat \from liv】es【toc】k\ that have\ been /given a diet from【 lo/cal and home-grown fo【o\【d \sou】\rces. This c\uts down the enviro【nmental impact of transpor\ting feed. Those that are \fed on/ crop by-pro】ducts and food waste, rather than\ food specifically grown for】】 them, a/re much mor/e s【/us【tainable too\. Pasture-fed a】nimals also he\lp keep carbon in the】 s】oil – a/no\ther environmental b/oon\.Rela【ted | \This】 【farm-to-table rest】aura】nt has【 b\een\ f】ully booked 】sin/ce its 【la/unchUse every p\art of the meatWaste less by using ever\y part /of the produce you bu\y – 】carcass【 a/nd all. Foo【d \wastage is a huge probl/em and】 it’s【 b【eli【eved【 that】 acro\ss the wor/ld househol\ds are \throwing aw【ay aroun\d 57【0,00】0 】tonnes of fr】esh meat each year (according to the\ book Farm\aged\don, that&rsquo【;s the equivalen【t of 50\ million chickens, 1.5 m【ill/ion pigs and \100,000 cows \&nda\sh\; //an 】unbelievabl】y h【igh amount).Animal\ bones, 【for example, can make amaz【ing stock \for s】oups and broths,/ a【nd thin【gs like chicken skin (which many people remove) tastes 【delicious when crispy. A【lso consider/ buying some of the /lesser-used】 cuts of meats f【】【rom your local butchers, /which help】s 】them\ waste】 less of the 【ani/mals they buy. 【Chicken th/ighs are more】 f\lavoursome】 than bre\asts (e】ven though the l/】atter tend t】【o be more pop/ular) and co\oked well, 【offal\ can be very【 appetising.Don&/r/squo;t forget to use you\r/ fre】e】zer too &nda/sh; 】you can freeze leftover portions of home\-cooked meals, or eve】n h\alf a pack of mince or an【 od】d ch【icken brea】st i\f you /don&r【squo;t \think yo\u’ll need i/t all immediately. Just remember to defrost a】nd cook th【e meat properly, and ideally 【don’\t leave it in/ /your free\zer fo】【r longer than【 t/】hree【/ months.Wo\rds: Clai/re\ MunningsShar【e th】i\s article / Mo/re from wellnessLlYg

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AczUT\ex【t sizeAaAaA lot\ has been said rec【ently abo【【ut the 】negati【ve\ impac【t of eating t/oo /much meat.\ N】ot \only ha\s too 【much of the proces\se】】d k】ind been linked to a higher ri【sk \of some cancers, /but the environmental 【impact of intensive 】farming and agric【ultural car】/bon emissions】 are a serious concern. \Ho【weve\r, you/ don’t necessarily have t/o turn veggi/e \in order to make a positive difference &\ndash; i\n【ste【ad make more thought【ful choices w\hen buyi】ng and c】ooking 】meat. Her\e&rsq/uo;s \how…Buy/ les/s mea\tThis may be obvious,】 【but buying less meat is one 】of the best thi】ngs you can do for both the environment and our】 health. 【We’re nearly al\l guilty of pi/ling too【 much o】】n our\ 【】【plates, and 】o【ften w\asti【ng bits that/ /w/】e can】’t manage to eat, so buying /less can h】elp reduce waste and ensur/e be【tter portion control while \a/lso/ lower】ing our environmental impact. R\ather than choosing pre-p/ac【ked sup\erma/【rk/et /mea【t where you h/ave very little choice】 in/ 【t【erms of quantity, try to buy from】 a \local butcher or farm shop where you can s】pecify exactly 】h\ow mu【ch you’d like. You’ll】 reduce your plasti\c usage t/his way too【.In【 part/】icu】lar, buy less b【eef – as methane-p\r\oduc\ers【, co\ws ar【e thought to have the \biggest i\mpact on our cl\imate as compared to any other form o\f l/ivestock. In fact, data s】ugge【sts that【 c】ows release the e\quiv\alent of 16k/g of carbon diox【id\e for ev\ery/ ki/l【o of mea【t produced. Interes】tingly, the impac】\t sh】eep have is al/so quite signif【ic/ant at 13kg of/ CO2 for/ every kilo o】f me/at produced.Bulk out mea\ls with extra vegetables (lentil】\s and beans are a great addition to dishes such as sp【/a\g【hetti 【Bolo/】gnese a】nd stews), and consider having at least one day a w\eek【 where \you eat no meat a】t a【ll. &lsq【【】uo】】;Meaty&r【squo/; vegetab【les such as mush】rooms and aubergines 】are gre/at alternatives【 t】o use o/n/ thes】e days 【and 【there ar【e plenty of r【ecipes online f\or hearty vegetarian】 dinners. Dishes that use lots of spic/es and herbs\ c\an【 als】/o help mask the absence of meat, as you’ll be \t\oo busy enjoyi/ng the bold flavou【rs to mis【s it.\Rel/ated |How to have\ a sustainable su/mm】er b/bqCh\o】ose m/eat tha【】t’s been produ【ced ethicallyWhen buyi【ng mea【t, opt for liv【esto/ck pr】od\uced by ethi\cal/ farmers usi】ng s【maller-scale methods that promote the welfare \of the an】ima【l【.【 This means avoi/\din【g【 in】tensi】【/vely【 farmed animals, which are simply bred for the highest output and profit possible and are often pumped full of a】n【ti\bi/otics (something whi/ch is incre】asin】gly becoming a t//hreat to human hea\lth). Look f】【or meats with a cre/dib【le animal welfare certification to\ pu/t your min/【d at rest. Local produce bought at place/s such as【 farm shops, org/\anic st】ores or go【od q/u/ality butchers are usual】ly re\a】red with【 t\hese 【ethic【al g】uidelines in mind.Relate\d【 | Top 7】 orga【nic res】taurants in L\on/donChoose me\at from livestock fed from l】ocal s】our】cesMany animals \re\are【d f\or their m】eat【 are fed on plant pro【tein】s that are 【/gro/\wn specifical】ly/ for this purpose \and imported. Sadly/, huge swath\es of land in/ coun/tries such as Brazil and Paraguay h【ave been impacted by t\his】 &\ndash; w\ith forests b\eing cut 【down and co/mmunitie/s moved to make way for crops. 】To lessen your environmenta【l footprint, choose meat \from liv】es【toc】k\ that have\ been /given a diet from【 lo/cal and home-grown fo【o\【d \sou】\rces. This c\uts down the enviro【nmental impact of transpor\ting feed. Those that are \fed on/ crop by-pro】ducts and food waste, rather than\ food specifically grown for】】 them, a/re much mor/e s【/us【tainable too\. Pasture-fed a】nimals also he\lp keep carbon in the】 s】oil – a/no\ther environmental b/oon\.Rela【ted | \This】 【farm-to-table rest】aura】nt has【 b\een\ f】ully booked 】sin/ce its 【la/unchUse every p\art of the meatWaste less by using ever\y part /of the produce you bu\y – 】carcass【 a/nd all. Foo【d \wastage is a huge probl/em and】 it’s【 b【eli【eved【 that】 acro\ss the wor/ld househol\ds are \throwing aw【ay aroun\d 57【0,00】0 】tonnes of fr】esh meat each year (according to the\ book Farm\aged\don, that&rsquo【;s the equivalen【t of 50\ million chickens, 1.5 m【ill/ion pigs and \100,000 cows \&nda\sh\; //an 】unbelievabl】y h【igh amount).Animal\ bones, 【for example, can make amaz【ing stock \for s】oups and broths,/ a【nd thin【gs like chicken skin (which many people remove) tastes 【delicious when crispy. A【lso consider/ buying some of the /lesser-used】 cuts of meats f【】【rom your local butchers, /which help】s 】them\ waste】 less of the 【ani/mals they buy. 【Chicken th/ighs are more】 f\lavoursome】 than bre\asts (e】ven though the l/】atter tend t】【o be more pop/ular) and co\oked well, 【offal\ can be very【 appetising.Don&/r/squo;t forget to use you\r/ fre】e】zer too &nda/sh; 】you can freeze leftover portions of home\-cooked meals, or eve】n h\alf a pack of mince or an【 od】d ch【icken brea】st i\f you /don&r【squo;t \think yo\u’ll need i/t all immediately. Just remember to defrost a】nd cook th【e meat properly, and ideally 【don’\t leave it in/ /your free\zer fo】【r longer than【 t/】hree【/ months.Wo\rds: Clai/re\ MunningsShar【e th】i\s article / Mo/re from wellness19X5

dT苏州废品回收HP

fFVwWhat if】\ 】/】we use】d the sea to diver\s/\if//y the stock of a/vailable biofuels?Resear\chers in Aarhus, De\nm【a\rk, are developing a fin【ancially via】ble process that does 】just that/.An ordina\ry ca】r is used to test the seaw【\eed fu【e\l, whi【ch scientists ca//ll a 3rd generation biofuel, and is a sustainable alternative to f/oss\il fuel】s.The tank is filled w】ith 10% seaweed fuel,】 the rest with petrol】 and its performance is compared with gas station fuels."The/ e【missions we 【meas【ure are CO, C【O2, and NOX. And \addi】tionally, we are measuring th/e pa/rticula/te emissi】on】s from th】e car,"/ sa\ys Sten Frand\sen - mechanica/l【 e【ngineer and busin】e【ss【 manage】r at DT】\I."The emission te】sts we got fr】om/ the seaweed】 fuel is on exactly the 【s【ame level /\as wha\t w】e \get from the \r】eferen/ce fuel."Sea【weed biofuel 】does not e/mit less CO2,\/ but \unl/ike \petrol, it extracts CO2 from the a\tmosphere while \gro【wing.\The】 researchers plan t\o \increase 】the portion 】used in the engi】ne tank, convinced that w【e will switch 】to biofuels in 【the upcoming years."We see】 a lot of el\ectrical cars entering the m/】arket, b】ut is that a one fix-all solution for /the CO2/ em【ission【s?" asks\ Frandsen."\Because we have hea【vy-duty tran】/\sport, we have sh】i】ps/ we have aerop/lanes,/ still c】onsuming a large amount of fossil fuels. We \nee】d 】a subst】i/tute for tha】t, and maybe\,【 seaweed co【uld be\/ som/e of the【 soluti【【on【".Why /is seaweed sustainabl\e? 【First, be\caus【e it /grows 】everywhere. It only needs the su\n and the sea,// which covers 70% of ou\r planet】.Its cultivation does not /requir【e any arable 】la\nd, 】fertilizer or freshwater/,/ like othe】r\ biof\u【els made out of/ agricultural \r\esidues for exam\ple.But 】how can 【this new fu\el be produced on an industrial 】s/cale? /This is the ch\allenge of 】a European re】search【 pr】oject c/alled Mac/roF/uels.Scien\【tists at the laboratory【 in P/etten, Nether【lands, 】are /searching f【o】r the best way t\o convert/ seaweed sug\ars to f\ue【ls.In/ some specie/s, this can r/【epres【ent up 【to 60% of\ the plant.【In /the l/】ong term, th/ey woul/d no l\onger】 have to produce bot/tles, /b\ut tons of 】ethanol and butanol barrels.】 S】til\l follo】wing a rat\her basi【c process\:"First /w\/e t】ake s\eawe/ed. And t\hen we use wa/ter to get the suga/rs】 out with some enzymes or acids," says Jaap Van 【Hal, a 【chemist &am\p; i【n\【n\ovation manager at b】iorefin/ery, TNO and macrofuel p/roject scie【ntific coordinat】o】r."\A】nd then you \get a sugar solution, and j/ust like you\ pr【oduce wine or beer, you f\er】ment it to /Ethanol or But\anol, and you blend t/hat with normal ga\soline or d【iesel to pr\oduce E10 \and t/hen you 【drive y/our car \on i】t."More biofuel/ production means more /se/aweed biomass. Th/anks to economies of scale an/d mechaniz/at/ion, res/e\archers\ h/ope to cut the fue\l produc【tio/n costs by 100 per cen】t.T【oget【her with comm【ercializi】ng oth/er】 seaweed 【products【, this could make fuels economically\ feasible in the future."When we started】 the p【roject a couple o\f year/s /ago【/, we were working】 with square meters. Today we are do【in\g hectares, 【and in t【he \near future, we will go in the squar/e kilometre range," says Bert Groenendaal【/, a chemist & R&a/mp;/D project coo/rdinator at】 \】SIOEN.T】o/day】, th\e pr】ice 】of a l\itre【 of seaweed-based biofue\l \is /way to\o high, probably a】 /hundred times more expensi】ve than traditi/o】nal fuels. But when the scale will go up, the p】rice will \g】o down, and we【 will\ get into a ran\ge where we will/ be comp\etitive with tr\aditional /fuels."Based】 on the exa\mple of the w】i【nd secto【r, scientists estimate】 t【hat it will take around 25 \years for the technology to be p\r】ofitable on 【a very large scale.1212Ad【dition\al\ so】urces\ •【 Edi/tor,\ Christele Ben Al\iShare this articleCopy/pas】te\ the /article video embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharese【ndShareTweetSharesendMo】reH\ideShar\eSe/ndShareShareShareSendShareS【h【areYou might also lik】\e \】 Could jellyfis】\【h be the a【nswer to fighting o/cean pol/l\ution? 【 】】 / / / / / Liquid windows and the energy-ef】ficient bu【ildin【gs of tomorrow \ More ab\outCarsFuelResearchEcologyEn【vironm\ental protecti/on/ \ Most viewed 【 What influence on climate is\ t\he corona】virus 】lock/down /really havi】n/g【? 】 / / 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】pr\ema/ture babies \from infe【ction / \ Messen【ge/r RNA: the /molec\ule 【that\ may teach our 】bodie/s to beat cancer 【 / 【 \ 】 \ 】 Apple and Google【 say they&#;ll work togethe】r【 to trace spread of】 coronavirus via /sm】artph】o【nes【 / How EU funding is cha/n【ging the/ f【a【\】ce of Latvi/an innovation 】 / 【 】 Browse】\ to\da【y'】;s tagsIoIM

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